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Extreme heat Mississippi cooking; residents urged to take precautions

Mississippi residents are trying to find ways to cool off as temperatures rise into the mid-90s, with actual temperatures over 100 degrees. Experts are warning residents to take precautions during the extreme heat by limiting time outdoors, taking breaks, staying hydrated and wearing light-colored, loose-fitting clothing. In response to the extreme heat, the city of Jackson has opened cooling centers for seniors. Residents 60 and older are invited to the Champion Community Center on Hattiesburg Street, Tougaloo Community Center on Vine Street, or the Smith Robertson Community Center on John Hart Street from 8 a.m. at 4 p.m. until Friday. “We recognize that we are dealing with hotter summers, colder winters and more rain each year,” Jackson Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba said. “We worked with philanthropic groups to do a heat mapping study. To understand the adverse effects of heat on our community, not only on our physical health, but also on things like the expenses that are incurred for homes,” Lumumba said. the least well-served communities are those that feel the effects of the heat the most. Neighborhoods that have fewer trees and more concrete lead to the “heat island effect” which, according to the mayor, makes them more vulnerable.

Mississippi residents are trying to find ways to cool off as temperatures rise into the mid-90s, with actual temperatures over 100 degrees.

Experts are warning residents to take precautions during the scorching heat by limiting time outdoors, taking breaks, staying hydrated and wearing loose, light-colored clothing.

In response to the extreme heat, the city of Jackson opened cooling centers for the elderly.

Residents 60 and older are invited to the Champion Community Center on Hattiesburg Street, the Tougaloo Community Center on Vine Street or the Smith Robertson Community Center on John Hart Street from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. until Friday.

“We recognize that we are dealing with hotter summers, colder winters and more rain each year,” Jackson Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba said. “We worked with philanthropic groups to do a heat mapping study. To understand the adverse effects of heat on our community, not only on our physical health, but also on things like home expenses.”

Lumumba said the underserved communities are feeling the effects of the heat the most. Neighborhoods that have fewer trees and more concrete lead to the “heat island effect” which, according to the mayor, makes them more vulnerable.